Upcoming course: Mapping Urban Data

 

Mapping Urban Data” will be the first in a series of video courses dedicated to exploring and visualizing data about cities. The course is coming soon on Morphocode Academy and will provide you with all the necessary skills to create web maps, work with data and explore urban insights.

You will learn how to collect and use geospatial data, as well as how to style and publish your maps on the web. “Mapping Urban Data” takes a hands-on approach to data visualization through a range of New York City–based case studies covering topics such as built density, energy consumption and mobility.

 

 

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Exploring the City: Case Study NYC

New York City is exemplary for its thorough use of data in urban analytics and policy evaluation. The success of large scale projects such as the reconstruction of Times Square; Green Light for Midtown and NYC Plaza Program is largely due to the data-driven approach applied by city departments. Currently, the Big Apple’s open data portal provides public access to over 1,500 datasets from various agencies, making the city a great starting point for data explorations.

 

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The course will introduce you to interactive web mapping through one of New York city’s most valuable datasets –  PLUTO. Containing detailed information on the tax lot level, PLUTO was first released to the open data community in 2013 and was considered a huge win. We will use PLUTO and a handful of other interesting datasets to explore urban insights and create interactive maps from the ground up.

 

 

Key Takeaways

“Mapping Urban Data” will guide you through a series of practical examples. You will start with a raw dataset, explore its attributes, design a map, add interactivity and finally publish it on the web. You will gain understanding of data formats, information design principles, cartography fundamentals and the coding skills required to finish the project.

The course is designed to be beginners-friendly and is suitable for architects, designers, urban planners, journalists or anyone genuinely interested in the topic. We will cover the following topics:

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Data
Learn how to handle open data sets and common data formats such as CSV, GeoJSON and Shapefiles. Work your way through data fields, types and file formats.

Information Design
Create beautiful maps and data visualizations. Learn the fundamentals of information design, color scales, qualitative and quantitative maps.

Cartography
Transform data into maps. Handle map projections, inspect features, modify data attributes and style geometries.


Web Mapping
Export your visualizations for the Web. Learn the fundamentals: raster and vector map tiles, Web Mercator, zoom levels, feature collections.

Interaction
Provide additional levels of interactivity. Handle user interactions and design a functional interface for your visualization.


Code
Learn JavaScript, HTML5 and CSS and bring your data to life. Combine data, map and story into a single web page and share it with your friends.

 

 

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The Big Picture: Data and the City

Rapid urbanization and advances in Information and communication technology are the most pervasive processes shaping the course of contemporary culture and society. “Data & The City” video series is about the intersection of these two global trends. As mobile devices become ubiquitous and spatial information even more abundant, data visualization allows a critical evaluation of active policies and city services by transforming otherwise hidden patterns into visual arguments. The act of transforming raw data into an interactive map creates visual narratives and opens up new possibilities for context-sensitive analysis conducted by urbanists, civic organizations, journalists and policy makers.

 

 

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The course is launching in the beginning of 2017 with special discounts for subscribers to Morphocode AcademyYou can subscribe in the form bellow and we will notify you when the course is available.

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Urban Layers: What’s next?

We recently announced our latest project Urban Layers – an interactive map that explores the structure of Manhattan’s urban fabric.

The project is a part of an ongoing research focused on the intersection of open data and urban planning. In that sense, visualizing historical data marks the begging of a long-term initiative.
At that point we’ve used open data and some of the latest mapping technologies to render more than 45000 buildings and allow user-interaction with the map.

We are happy to trace and track all of the positive feedback and shout out a big “Thanks” to everyone who shared the project!

 

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In the Media

We were happy to see Urban Layers gain some attention as it was named Map of the week by Gmaps Mania.

” Urban Layers is an incredible new mapped visualization of Manhattan’s building history. The map uses building construction data from PLUTO with Mapbox GL to create a highly responsive and interactive tool to explore the history of building construction in central New York.”

Mapping the History of Manhattan’s Growth
Keir Clarke — GMapsMania

 

Michelle Young — founder of @untappedcities published a great article about the project:

“A map tool that opens with a quote from Rem Koolhaas’ Delirious New York? How could we resist?”

Explore the Phantom Architecture of NYC’s Past

 

The map was also published on FastCodesign, gizmodo, curbedNYLesEchos.frLumieres de la villeArkitera and featured in a video by France24.

“Morphocode has done their fair part in decoding the building hullaballoo with Urban Layers, an interactive map that allows users to scroll through different decades while it depicts how development spread across the city.”

See How Development in Manhattan Spread Over 250 Years

 

On Citylab

Urban Layers ultimately made it to the front page of Citylab where it became the most popular story.  Make sure to read the full article written by Kriston Capps.

 

“Seeing when those buildings were constructed at the parcel level with a simple slide of a rule is a real advance in data mapping”

Mapping the Age of Every Building in Manhattan

 

 

 

On Twitter

The response on twitter was great. Here are some of our favourite tweets:

 

 

What’s Next?

Urban Layers is a work-in-progress. We have just scratched the surface of what is possible in terms of dynamic urban mapping and we are looking forward to:

Add more ‘Data Layers’
PLUTO – the dataset used in Urban Layers contains various information for each building: year built, footprint, height, ownership, etc. The ‘year built’ data is arguably the most inaccurate field and we are planning to add the rest of the available data to the map.
Adding more data fields and the ability to filter and cross-reference layers will provide a more in-depth look into urban dynamics.

Add more Cities
Adding the rest of NYC, as well as other cities is also something that we are excited about. Amsterdam and Chicago are great candidates for that since they already provide various open data sets.
Do you want to see a particular city/community featured? Drop us a line and let us know.

Fix Bugs
There are a couple of bugs related to the WebGL renderer that prevent to see the map in detail with some hardware configurations.

Better Mobile/Browser Support
We would like to improve the support for touch-enabled devices that support WebGL.

 

 

Support the project

The guys at Mapbox were kind enough to provide us with a one year standard plan and we are looking forward to use its full potential. Thank you Eric & Matt!

For anyone else willing to support the project or interested in any kind of collaboration – feel free to contact us !

Hope you’ve enjoyed Urban Layers. Thanks for spreading the word!

 

Layers of NYC: Exploring Manhattan’s urban fabric

Layers of NYC is an interactive map created by Morphocode that explores the structure of Manhattan’s urban fabric.

The map lets you navigate through historical fragments of the city that have been preserved and are now embedded in Manhattan’s densely built environment. The rigid archipelago of building blocks has been mapped as a succession of structural episodes starting from 1765.
You can use the timeline sliders to identify some of Manhattan’s oldest buildings; discover how the beginning of the 20th century marked the island skyline or to define the distribution of building activity over the last decades.

We’ve used data from PLUTO and the latest technology from Mapbox – Mapbox GL to create a highly interactive experience.

The map is currently in beta and will soon be available online.  Here is a preview:

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User Interactions:

 

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Make sure to subscribe for our newsletter and we’ll notify you when the map is online:

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